Food Sensitivity Kitchen https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/ Cooking to enable those you love to flourish Wed, 16 Nov 2022 15:56:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/cropped-CKS-outside-small-size-square-32x32.jpeg Food Sensitivity Kitchen https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/ 32 32 Episode 057 Orange Peel Tea https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode057/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode057/#respond Tue, 15 Nov 2022 17:00:43 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8639 The post Episode 057 Orange Peel Tea appeared first on Food Sensitivity Kitchen.

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Transcript

Welcome to The Sensitive Kitchen where home cooks are inspired to Cook to Enable Those You Love to Flourish. I’m Cindy Sullivan, registered dietitian, passionate nutrition, educator, and accomplished home cook. Whether you’re changing how you cook for food sensitivities, allergies, intolerances, or just trying to eat healthier on a budget, you’re in the right place.

Most episodes, I will share favorite recipes as well as modification tips and nutrition benefits. Occasionally I’ll have a guest or special episode like modifying holiday favorites. My favorite foods? They’re raspberries and homemade chocolate chip cookies. My latest cooking project was long fermented sourdough bread,

Transcript  coming soon!

References

Anti-histamine release and anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extracts of citrus fruits peels
September 2013Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine 13(3)
DOI:10.1007/s13596-012-0093-z

Authors:  I. Tsujiyama, S. Mubassara, H. Aoshima, Sheikh Julfikar Hossain  Khulna University

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257805832_Anti-histamine_release_and_anti-inflammatory_activities_of_aqueous_extracts_of_citrus_fruits_peels

Benefits of Drinking Boiled Orange Peel Water
https://cradiori.co/benefits-of-drinking-boiled-orange-peel-water/

Can Washing Remove Pesticide Residues From Fruits and Vegetables?
June 4, 2020 Oscar

https://www.greenerchoices.org/can-washing-remove-all-pesticides-a-closer-look-at-oranges/

Can You Eat Orange Peels, and Should You?
By Kelli McGrane, MS, RD — Medically reviewed by Kathy W. Warwick, R.D., CDE, Nutrition — Updated on April 19, 2021
Healthline Nutrition  https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/can-you-eat-orange-peels

Citrus peel as a source of functional ingredient: A review
ShafiyaRafiqaEnvelopeRajkumariKaulaS.A.SofiaNadiaBashiraFizaNazirbGulzarAhmad NayikcPersonEnvelope
Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences

Volume 17, Issue 4, October 2018, Pages 351-358  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1658077X16300960

The Dietary Fiber Pectin: Health Benefits and Potential for the Treatment of Allergies by Modulation of Gut Microbiota
Frank Blanco-Pérez,pastedGraphic.png1 Hanna Steigerwald,1 Stefan Schülke,1 Stefan Vieths,1 Masako Toda,2 and Stephan Scheurer1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8433104/

Effect of different cooking methods on the content of vitamins and true retention in selected vegetables
Food Sci Biotechnol. 2018 Apr; 27(2): 333–342.

Published online 2017 Dec 12. doi: 10.1007/s10068-017-0281-1

PMCID: PMC6049644  PMID: 30263756

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6049644/

Effects of different cooking methods on health-promoting compounds of broccoli. Yuan, Gf., Sun, B., Yuan, J. et al.  J. Zhejiang Univ. Sci. B 10, 580–588 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1631/jzus.B0920051 

Effects of heat treatment of mandarin peel on flavonoid profiles and lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes JeehyeSung1Joon HyukSuh1YuWangPersonEnvelope
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S102194981930050X

Orange Aromatherapy for Anxiety
Written By Michael Greger M.D. FACLM • March 31, 2015
Last updated: December 22, 2020 3:31 pm 
NutritionFacts.com

Potential of Pectins to Beneficially Modulate the Gut Microbiota Depends on Their Structural Properties
Nadja Larsen,1,* Carlota Bussolo de Souza,2 Lukasz Krych,1 Thiago Barbosa Cahú,1 Maria Wiese,1 Witold Kot,3 Karin Meyer Hansen,4 Andreas Blennow,5 Koen Venema,2,6 and Lene Jespersen1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6384267/

Tests Find Hormone-Disrupting Fungicides on Most Citrus Fruit Samples
BY ALEXIS TEMKIN, PH.D., SYDNEY EVANS AND OLGA V. NAIDENKO, PH.D.
MARCH 17, 2021
https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/citrus.php

4 Benefits of Drinking Orange Peel Tea
peels.com

https://peels.com/blogs/news/4-benefits-of-drinking-orange-peel-tea

6 Amazing Benefits Of Orange Peel
by John Staughton (BASc, BFA) last updated – February 03, 2020 Evidence Based
Organic Facts
https://www.organicfacts.net/orange-peel.html

6 Bizarre Orange Peel Facts You Need to Know|
August 23, 2021 by Dr. Casey Sinclair, CFMP, DC

https://familyhealthadvocacy.com/6-bizarre-orange-peel-facts-you-need-to-know/

10 Amazing Health Benefits of Orange Peels
Manipal Hospital
https://www.manipalhospitals.com/blog/10-amazing-health-benefits-of-orange-peels

25 Proven Health Benefits of Orange Peel Tea”
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/25-proven-health-benefits-orange-peel-tea-dr-paul-haider

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Orange Peel Tea https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/orange-peel-tea/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/orange-peel-tea/#respond Tue, 15 Nov 2022 17:00:29 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8636 Comforting and soothing when warm, refreshing when cold, orange peel tea is a very low calorie beverage that delights both your taste buds and your pocketbook. Why make orange peel tea? Orange peel tea is simple, easy and quick to make.    Saves you money by helping you get all the goodness from the oranges […]

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Comforting and soothing when warm, refreshing when cold, orange peel tea is a very low calorie beverage that delights both your taste buds and your pocketbook.

Orange peel in a small pot with water being poured in. Pomegranates, pears, pineapple and bananas in the background.

Why make orange peel tea?

  • Orange peel tea is simple, easy and quick to make.   
  • Saves you money by helping you get all the goodness from the oranges you already purchase. Like apple peel tea, this is more a method than a recipe (but I have included a place to start.)
  • Many variations (see below)
  • Health benefits (see below)
  • Many commercial beverages have chemicals your family may be sensitive to.  So make your own refreshing beverages. 

This is the third in our three part series on saving money by getting more out of the groceries you are already purchasing.

Simple Recipe

Thankfully the simplest is also my favorite.  

  • Peel your orange.  
  • Instead of throwing away the peel, place it in a small sauce pan with 2 cups of water.  
  • Cover the pot (so your tea does not boil away!).  
  • Bring to a boil.  
  • Turn down the heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes.  
  • Strain and enjoy.

Pouring tea with orange peels through a strainer into a glass measuing cup.

Variations

  • Add spices.
  • Use mandarin or other citrus peels.
  • Add a bit of orange juice to the tea for a little extra flavor.
  • Add green, white, or black tea.
  • Here is my take on all the above options:  

I used my chai blend (cinnamon stick, ginger, cardamom pods, whole cloves) to orange tea. When fresh spices were added at the beginning, we found  that the spices tended to overwhelm the orange flavor. It was good, but it depends on the flavors you like best.

cinnamon stick with cloves, cardamom pods, and ginger below it.

I froze mandarin peels to make tea.  They were significantly more bitter than the tea made from oranges.  By all means try other citrus varieties, but we are sticking to oranges!

I was making a salad with oranges for a party.  I used the peels to make tea and cut the oranges into segments which produced a lot of juice.  I added the juice into the tea after I strained it.  Delicious.  I had about 1/2 cup orange juice to add to 12 cups of orange tea.

#1 I have not yet tried.  I like my  black tea with milk so   . . . But since I like Earl Grey and bergamot (the flavoring in Earl Grey tea) is an orange relative I bet it will be tasty.

Health Benefits??

You hear ALL kinds of health benefits from drinking orange peel tea.  But let me warn you that most of these assume you EAT the orange peels.  I don’t.  So I enjoy my free beverage with no added sugar and few calories and  any health benefits are extras.

What are the health benefits I am getting in my orange peel tea?

Reducing Anxiety and Depression

Orange peel oils as aromatherapy has been shown to  help lift anxiety and depression.  It left participants feeling more energetic.  This is a benefit orange peel tea can provide.  Both when peeling the orange, making and consuming the tea, you get the wonderful smell of oranges!

Asthma and respiratory allergy symptoms

Orange peel tea may help inhibit the histamine response that can cause allergic reactions and asthma.

Drinking hot orange tea is a perfect drink during cold and  flu season. It has been used in Chinese medicine for years to treat common colds.

Possible  Health Benefits

Vitamin C

Orange peels contain even more vitamin C than the whole oranges!  But they are not often eaten due to their unappealing texture and the fact that they can interfere with digestion if not ground finely.

Your orange peel tea may provide some vitamin C, but let me remind you that vitamin C is destroyed by heat and leaching into cooking water.  

In one experiment, boiling broccoli and potatoes, cut into 2 cm pieces, for 5 minutes caused a loss of about 50% of the vitamin C.  Less vitamin C was lost from sweet potatoes and carrots.  But for orange peel tea, the question is how much was destroyed and how much leached into the cooking water (which you would drink)?? 

Without sending the orange peel tea to a lab, it is impossible to tell how much vitamin C or soluble fiber your orange peel tea contains.  It could contain up to about 35g of vitamin C per cup.  Not too bad!

What about soluble fiber?

Orange peels are full of pectin, a soluble fiber.  Soluble  fibers have several health benefits like reduction in blood cholesterol, slowing the rate of glucose absorption and having beneficial effects on your gut microbiome.  

However remember that we are not EATING the orange peels. But the “soluble” part of soluble fiber means that is is fermentable and dissolves (at least somewhat) in water.  So it is possible that a small amount of soluble fiber leaches from your orange peels into your tea.  But don’t give up your oatmeal or quick white beans for lunch – this is not enough soluble fiber to make a huge difference. 

Nutrients and Phytochemicals

Orange peels contain a variety of nutrients: fiber, vitamins (C and B vitamins), and minerals (copper, calcium, magnesium).

They also contain antioxidants, flavonols and polyphenols that protect against diseases such as lung problems and heart conditions. One compound known as limonene may also have anti-cancer effects. (See podcast for more details.)

Bottom line on Nutrients

Orange peels contain vitamins (vitamin C, folate), minerals (copper, calcium and magnesium) carotenoids, flavonoids, polyphenols (like limonene which may protect against cancer.)  But without sending the orange peel tea to the laboratory we do not know how many of these beneficial compounds end up in your tea.

Orange peel tea is good for you.  It helps you stretch your grocery dollar by giving you a free delicious beverage made from orange peels without any added sugars or chemicals.  It may even improve your  mood, increase your energy and decrease your asthma or respiratory allergy symptoms.  But do not expect it to be a miracle cure.  Keep eating your fruits and vegetables!  Enjoy both the orange and the tea made from the peel.

Organic oranges  – should I purchase them for orange peel tea?

They are more expensive so  it may lessen the impact of saving money.   But if you are drinking orange peel tea regularly, you  may want to consider organic oranges.  Usually I say they are not worth  it because the residues in the fruit are very small.   But in this preparation we are using  the  peels.   I found Healthline’s summary of this information helpful so I will share it with you:

Pesticides are frequently used on citrus fruits like oranges Though studies have found the inner fruit of oranges to have very low or undetectable pesticide levels, the peels contain significantly higher amounts (14).

Studies link chronic pesticide intake to negative health effects, including increased cancer risk and hormone dysfunction. These effects are primarily associated with chronically high levels of exposure rather than the relatively small amounts found in the peels and skins of fruits.

However, it’s still recommended to wash oranges under hot water to reduce the amount of pesticides ingested (14).

The FDA allows a very limited/regulated use of citrus red 2 food dye to be sprayed on some oranges to improve color but the amount used is extremely small. Human research is lacking on any health effects of consuming citrus red 2 dye.”

Thanks Healthline!

Be sure to rinse your oranges  – not only to possibly reduce pesticide and  fungicides but also to remove dirt!

In addition,  according to the study I reviewed, oranges grown in the United States had significantly less pesticide residues than oranges imported from other countries.  So if possible pesticide exposure is of concern, purchase oranges grown in the United States.  Also oranges purchased in the  summer had higher residues than in the winter.  (I believe this is due to fungicides applied after harvesting  to prevent the oranges from molding.)

If you decide you love orange peel tea and drink it all  winter, then you may want to purchase organic oranges.

How long does it keep? 

Several weeks in the refrigerator.  It can be frozen for longer storage.

small carafe of orange peel tea with an orange peel by the side and spices in a clear open jar

Should I use the whole peel or just the orange part?

I tried a side by side comparison.  I used a vegetable peeler to peel a thin slice of orange off the rind.  I used this to make tea and I compared it to tea made with the  whole rind.   There was no difference between the two.  I know many say that using the whole rind  is bitter,  but it has not proved to be so with the oranges I used.  If you find your tea bitter, try using a vegetable peeler to leave the white part on the orange.  It takes much less time to just peel and orange, so that is my preferred method.

Three pictures on top showing oranges peeled with a peeler and in pot with water. Underneath orange peeled by hand and in pot with water.

small carafe of orange peel tea with an orange peel by the side and spices in a clear open jar
Print

Orange Peel Tea

Course Drinks
Cuisine American
Keyword dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free, nut-free, peanut-free, soy-free, vegan
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings 1
Cost free!

Ingredients

  • 1 orange peel
  • 2 cups water

Optional Chai Spices

  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 cardamom pods
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1 inch fresh ginger OR 2 pieces crystallized ginger

Instructions

  • Peel orange, place in a small saucepan.
  • Add water and cover the pot.
  • Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 15-20 minues.
  • Strain and enjoy!
  • Good hot or cold. If you are making a big batch, it keeps several weeks in the refrigerator or freeze for longer storage.

Using Spices

  • If your spices are fresh, add them the last 5 minutes.
  • If your spices have been used before (I use mine 3-4 times before discarding), add with the orange peels.

References

Anti-histamine release and anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extracts of citrus fruits peels
September 2013Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine 13(3)
DOI:10.1007/s13596-012-0093-z

Authors:  I. Tsujiyama, S. Mubassara, H. Aoshima, Sheikh Julfikar Hossain  Khulna University

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257805832_Anti-histamine_release_and_anti-inflammatory_activities_of_aqueous_extracts_of_citrus_fruits_peels

Benefits of Drinking Boiled Orange Peel Water
https://cradiori.co/benefits-of-drinking-boiled-orange-peel-water/

Can Washing Remove Pesticide Residues From Fruits and Vegetables?
June 4, 2020 Oscar

https://www.greenerchoices.org/can-washing-remove-all-pesticides-a-closer-look-at-oranges/

Can You Eat Orange Peels, and Should You?
By Kelli McGrane, MS, RD — Medically reviewed by Kathy W. Warwick, R.D., CDE, Nutrition — Updated on April 19, 2021
Healthline Nutrition  https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/can-you-eat-orange-peels

Citrus peel as a source of functional ingredient: A review
ShafiyaRafiqaEnvelopeRajkumariKaulaS.A.SofiaNadiaBashiraFizaNazirbGulzarAhmad NayikcPersonEnvelope
Journal of the Saudi Society of Agricultural Sciences

Volume 17, Issue 4, October 2018, Pages 351-358  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1658077X16300960

The Dietary Fiber Pectin: Health Benefits and Potential for the Treatment of Allergies by Modulation of Gut Microbiota
Frank Blanco-Pérez,pastedGraphic.png1 Hanna Steigerwald,1 Stefan Schülke,1 Stefan Vieths,1 Masako Toda,2 and Stephan Scheurer1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8433104/

Effect of different cooking methods on the content of vitamins and true retention in selected vegetables
Food Sci Biotechnol. 2018 Apr; 27(2): 333–342.

Published online 2017 Dec 12. doi: 10.1007/s10068-017-0281-1

PMCID: PMC6049644  PMID: 30263756

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6049644/

Effects of different cooking methods on health-promoting compounds of broccoli. Yuan, Gf., Sun, B., Yuan, J. et al.  J. Zhejiang Univ. Sci. B 10, 580–588 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1631/jzus.B0920051

Effects of heat treatment of mandarin peel on flavonoid profiles and lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes JeehyeSung1Joon HyukSuh1YuWangPersonEnvelope
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S102194981930050X

Orange Aromatherapy for Anxiety
Written By Michael Greger M.D. FACLM • March 31, 2015
Last updated: December 22, 2020 3:31 pm
NutritionFacts.com

Potential of Pectins to Beneficially Modulate the Gut Microbiota Depends on Their Structural Properties
Nadja Larsen,1,* Carlota Bussolo de Souza,2 Lukasz Krych,1 Thiago Barbosa Cahú,1 Maria Wiese,1 Witold Kot,3 Karin Meyer Hansen,4 Andreas Blennow,5 Koen Venema,2,6 and Lene Jespersen1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6384267/

Tests Find Hormone-Disrupting Fungicides on Most Citrus Fruit Samples
BY ALEXIS TEMKIN, PH.D., SYDNEY EVANS AND OLGA V. NAIDENKO, PH.D.
MARCH 17, 2021
https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/citrus.php

4 Benefits of Drinking Orange Peel Tea
peels.com

https://peels.com/blogs/news/4-benefits-of-drinking-orange-peel-tea

6 Amazing Benefits Of Orange Peel
by John Staughton (BASc, BFA) last updated – February 03, 2020 Evidence Based
Organic Facts
https://www.organicfacts.net/orange-peel.html

6 Bizarre Orange Peel Facts You Need to Know|
August 23, 2021 by Dr. Casey Sinclair, CFMP, DC

https://familyhealthadvocacy.com/6-bizarre-orange-peel-facts-you-need-to-know/

10 Amazing Health Benefits of Orange Peels
Manipal Hospital
https://www.manipalhospitals.com/blog/10-amazing-health-benefits-of-orange-peels

25 Proven Health Benefits of Orange Peel Tea”
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/25-proven-health-benefits-orange-peel-tea-dr-paul-haider

The post Orange Peel Tea appeared first on Food Sensitivity Kitchen.

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Episode 056 Apple Peel Tea https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode056/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode056/#respond Wed, 02 Nov 2022 11:00:59 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8611 The post Episode 056 Apple Peel Tea appeared first on Food Sensitivity Kitchen.

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Transcript

Welcome to The Sensitive Kitchen where home cooks are inspired to Cook to Enable Those You Love to Flourish. I’m Cindy Sullivan, registered dietitian, passionate nutrition, educator, and accomplished home cook. Whether you’re changing how you cook for food sensitivities, allergies, intolerances, or just trying to eat healthier on a budget, you’re in the right place.

Most episodes, I will share favorite recipes as well as modification tips and nutrition benefits. Occasionally I’ll have a guest or special episode like modifying holiday favorites. My favorite foods? They’re raspberries and homemade chocolate chip cookies. My latest cooking project was long fermented sourdough bread,

Have you made apple sauce this fall and apple pie or apple cake? What did you do with the apple cores and peels? Using your apple throwaways, the apple peels and cores,you can make a delicious beverage that you can serve warm or cold.

Right now, we’re in the middle of a three podcast series about making the most of your grocery budget. Many of you must already purchase pricier alternative products due to food allergies, sensitivities, or restrictions. Last week we talked about pickling green tomatoes. Today we’re discussing apple tea and next week orange peel tea, so start saving your orange rinds either drying on the counter or in the fridge or freezer for next time. One of the ways you can make the most of your food budget is to fully use the food that you purchase. For example, I save my bone in steak bones and lamb shank bones to make soup stock. I make refrigerator pickles out of my green tomatoes, and for several years, I’ve turned my apple peels and cores into a spiced apple tea.

Okay, what is apple tea? This is not apple juice, and it’s not a real tea either. It’s rather a flavored beverage made from apple throwaways, the peels and the cores. You can easily modify it to suit your tastes. It’s all natural, contains no added sweeteners, very few calories unless you decide to add them.

Well, is apple tea good for you? This is a delicious low calorie beverage that only contains water, apple, and spices. I use cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, and cloves. So some of the goodness of the cinnamon sticks and ginger may leach into the tea, but I don’t count it as a major source of nutrients. Think of it as a wonderful free replacement for any other beverage you would normally purchase.

So how to make apple tea? It is simple, and first of all, this is not an exact recipe. It’s rather a method, and you’re going to find what works best for you. You’re going to start with about the same volume of apple peels and cores and water.

So if you have about three cups of apple peels and cores, add about three cups of water to your pot. I honestly don’t measure, I just eyeball it. Cover your pot and bring the water and the apple peels and cores to a boil, gently simmer for about an hour. This is a very mild tasting tea, so you need to simmer for a long time to get more of the apple flavor out of the peels and cores.

You can simmer for longer, but if you’re using the spices, you wanna simmer them in the apple tea for about 15 minutes. If you add the spices about 15 minutes before you’re ready to stop simmering, I find that works best because then when you strain everything, the spices will automatically be strained out or you can tie them in a cheese cloth or something else and put them in for about 15 minutes and just pull them out. You’re then going to strain your tea and either serve it immediately or refrigerate it for later use.

Okay, sometimes when I’m making a big pot of apple sauce or an apple pie, I have a lot of peels and course to use at one time, but a lot of times I’m just cutting one up to eat for lunch or packing one for one of my family to go out of the house, and then I will save the cores, put them in a rubber made container in my freezer and hang onto it. Or you can use any kind of container or even a plastic bag in your refrigerator or your freezer, so you can hang onto those peels and see, excuse me, cores, until you’re ready to use them.

As I already mentioned, you need about the same amount of peels and cores and water, and so just hang onto them. They will store for a week or more in your fridge or for months in your freezer. Right now I have a freezer container in my freezer accumulating cores from when I cut apples for lunches and snacks.

Now the next question is, is about seeds. Because many of you are aware that it’s not recommended that you chew on a lot of apple seeds and eat them an occasional one that you swallow whole is not a problem.

Let’s talk a little bit about this. Apple seeds contain small amounts of a compound that easily turns into cyanide with your digestive enzymes. However, the coating on the outside of the seeds protects you from this toxin. It’s only when you ch thoroughly chew or grind up those apple seeds that you might have problems, and in order to cause toxic results, you have to thoroughly chew anywhere from 83 to 500 seeds.

It is really not a problem in apple tea since you’re gonna strain out the seeds and you’re not gonna crush them. But just to be on the very, very safe side, I actually take the seeds out before I refrigerator freeze my course. It’s the most time consuming part of this recipe, but it takes less than 30 seconds per core.

Just take your finger crack them open, or a knife. and put the seeds in the trash. Don’t worry if an occasional seed slips into your tea, you’ll be fine. If you want to know more about this, I’ll put a link to one of my references, which has links to lots more references in the show notes at this episode, foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode056.

Okay, so how long does apple tea keep? It keeps several weeks in the refrigerator or up to a year in the freezer this August. I just finished the apple tea from last fall. It was delicious iced. In fact, I think it’s my favorite way to drink it is cold.

So how do I flavor my apple tea? Let me give you some options: cinnamon sticks, fresh or crystallized ginger pieces, cardamon pods, whole cloves. My favorite way to do this is the same way I make decaf chai, except instead of using tea bags, I use apple tea. So for about 10 to 12 cups of apples and 10 to 12 cups of water, I use two cinnamon sticks, 10 to 15 cardamom pods about a one inch piece of ginger sliced,or two to three pieces of crystallized ginger, depending how big your crystallized ginger is, and about 10 to 12 whole cloves. You can add or subtract any of those.

Okay? Now, if you’re using fresh spices, meaning they’re the first time that those spices have been used, you won’t want to boil them for more than about 15 minutes because if you boil them for a really long time, it could make your tea bitter and it will overwhelm the flavor of apple tea. Apple tea is a very mild tasting beverage, and all you’ll taste is spice. So about 15 minutes.

Now, when you take the spices out, put them in a jar, throw them in your fridge, and you can use them again. I usually use them about three to four times before I’m done, and the very last time, after using them three or four times, you can boil them for up to an hour and they won’t make your tea bitter because you’ve lost much of the flavor of those spices.

So how much does apple tea cost? The tea is free since you’re using apple cores and peels that you’ve already purchased for some other reason. However, if you use whole spices, there’s a significant cost in the spices. Cardamon pods and cinnamon sticks are expensive. There’s no two ways around it. The good thing is, is that purchasing these once is a large expense, but they will last you a very long time. I use my cardamom pods regularly, and they last me way more than a year.

So for the price of about 10 chai tea lattes from Starbucks, I can have spices to last me more than a year, and everything else is something I’m purchasing anyway, so I’m not spending anymore.

People ask, where do I purchase my spices? Because frankly, cardamom pods are not sold at my local grocery store. I purchase my spices at a place called The Spice House, and I have them shipped from Chicago. It’s a Chicago store that’s been in business for a very long time, and see that accompanying blog post foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode056 for more information about that.

So save your apple peels and make this mild comforting taste of fall, freeze some to serve cold next summer. Put it in a crock pot and serve it warm for holiday gatherings when people come in.

Also, speaking of holiday gatherings, holiday eating is coming. I know this can be a really stressful time for some of us. I would love to hear from you. What would help you navigate these food holidays?

Would a workshop on modifying family favorites help you or suggestions on what to serve?

Some of my favorite recipes?

Or maybe a live two week masterclass class where you would go try new recipes and come back to report results, get more ideas and substitutes?
Let me know.

Drop me a line, cindy@foodsensitivitykitchen.com, or you can go to my website and just leave me a comment or reply there. This is episode 056 on Apple peel tea. Until next week when we talk about Orange peel tea getting ready for the holidays, both would be a great combo to have!

Keep Cooking to Enable Those You Love to Flourish.

Have a wonderful day. Thank you so much for joining me today. Bye-bye.

 

References

Are apple seeds poisonous?
Medical News Today 
Medically reviewed by Miho Hatanaka, RDN, L.D. — By Atli Arnarson Ph.D. — Updated on May 14, 2020

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318706#cyanide-intake

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Apple Peel Tea https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/apple-peel-tea/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/apple-peel-tea/#respond Wed, 02 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8594 Apple “throwaways” (the apple peels and cores) make a delicious beverage you can serve warm or cold. Have you made apple sauce this fall?  An apple pie or cake?  What did you do with the apple cores and peels? Saving Money  One of the ways you can make the most of  your food budget is to […]

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Apple “throwaways” (the apple peels and cores) make a delicious beverage you can serve warm or cold.

Have you made apple sauce this fall?  An apple pie or cake?  What did you do with the apple cores and peels?

Saving Money 

One of the ways you can make the most of  your food budget is to fully use the food that you purchase.  For example I save my bone-in  steak bones and lamb shank bones to make soup stock.  I make refrigerator pickles out of my green tomatoes.  And for several years I have turned my apple peels and cores into a spiced apple “tea”.  

What is apple tea?

This is not a real tea, rather a flavored beverage made from apple “throwaways” (peels and cores) that you can modify to suit your taste.  It is all natural and contains no added sweeteners, unless you decide to add them.  

Is apple tea good for you?

This is a delicious low-calorie  beverage that only contains apples and spices.  I use cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and cloves.  So some of  the goodness  of the cinnamon sticks and ginger  may leach into the tea, but  I do not count it as a major source of nutrients.  Think of it as a wonderful, free replacement for any other beverage you would normally purchase.  

How to make apple tea?

First of all, this is more of a method than an exact recipe.  

Add about the same volume of apple peels and cores and water.  So if you  have 3 cups of apple peels and cores, add about 3 cups of water to your pot.  I honestly  don’t measure – I just eyeball it!!

6 pictures showing the steps to make apple peel tea

Cover your pot and bring it to a boil.  Gently  simmer for about an hour.  You  can simmer apple tea for longer, but if you are using spices you will want to simmer them in the apple tea for about 15 minutes.  So  add the spices about 15  minutes before you are ready to  stop simmering.  

Strain  your tea and serve immediately or refrigerate for later use.

How can I store the peels and seeds until I am ready to use them?

As I already  mentioned, to  make apple tea, you use about the same number of peels/cores  and water.  Until you  have enough to make tea, store them in a plastic container or freezer bag in your refrigerator  or freezer.  They will keep a week or more in the fridge, and for months in the freezer.  Right now I have a freezer container in my freezer accumulating cores from when I cut apples for lunches or snacks.

3 containers filled with frozen apple peels and cores

Can I use the seeds?

Apple seeds contain small amounts of cyanide.  However  the seed coating protects you from this toxin.  In order to cause problems, you would have to thoroughly  chew and eat 83-500  seeds.  

It is not really a problem in apple tea, since you will strain out the seeds and not crush them, but since this is a possibility, I take out the  seeds before I freeze (or refrigerate) my cores. It is the most time consuming part of this recipe, but it takes less than 30 seconds per core. Do not worry if an occasional seed slips into your tea.

How long does it keep?

Apple tea keeps several weeks refrigerated or up to a year in the freezer.  This August I just finished the apple tea from last fall.  It was delicious iced.

Give me some flavoring options

  • cinnamon sticks
  • fresh ginger slices
  • crystalized ginger slices or pieces
  • cardamom pods
  • cloves

apples, cinnamon sticks and a glass of apple tea in a clear glass on a white counter

My favorite is apple chai. I use the same spices I use  to make my own decaf chai tea.

For 10-12 cups apples and 10-12 cups water.I use

  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 10-15 cardamom pods
  • a 1 inch piece fresh ginger or 2-3 pieces of crystalized ginger
  • 10-12 whole cloves

3 apples, cinnamon sticks, crystalized ginger, whole cloves, cardamom pods

If you are using fresh spices, you will want to boil them for about 15 minutes then remove them from your apple/water mixture.

If you are using spices that have been used before, you can boil them longer.  Last time I made apple tea, I used spices that had been used in decaf chai twice already so I put them in and boiled them for an hour.  It was just fine!  

If you boil the spices too long you run the risk of turning your tea bitter or the taste of the spices being overwhelming.  This tea has a mild taste so it is easy  to overwhelm the flavor.

Cost

This “tea” is free since you are using apple cores and peels.  However if you use the whole spices, there is significant cost in the spices.  Cardamom  pods and cinnamon sticks are expensive.  The good thing is that purchasing these once is a large expense, but they will last you a LONG time.  I use my cardamom pods regularly and they still last me more than a year.

For the price of about 10 chai tea lattes from Starbucks, I can have the spices to last me more than a year . . . . and everything else is something I am purchasing anyway so I am not spending more.

Where do you purchase spices?

I purchase my spices at The Spice House. I especially like that their flatpacks always ship for free.

So save your apple peels and make this mild, comforting taste of fall!  And freeze some to serve cold next summer!

apples, cinnamon sticks, crystoalized ginger, whole cloves, cardamom pods and a cup of apple tea in a clear mug
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Apple Peel Tea

Course Drinks
Cuisine American
Keyword dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free, nut-free, peanut-free, soy-free
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 6 cups apple peels and cores without seeds
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 cinnamon stick *
  • ½ inch piece fresh ginger, sliced or use crystalized ginger
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 6 cardamom pods

Instructions

  • Add apples peels, cores and water to a large pot.
    apple peels and cores covered with water in pot
  • Cover and bring to a boil.
  • Reduce heat and simmer for about 1 hour. Look for color when testing if the tea is done. Tasting is a good option to determine donenes.
    apple tea and apple peels in pot. Spoon pusihing aside peels to show red/brown color of tea.
  • Options for adding spices. If fresh (new) spices, add the last 15 minutes of cooking. If the spices have been used before, they can be added at the beginning. You can also package the spices in a coffee filter or cheesecloth tied with a string to easily remove and save spices.
    3 apples, cinnamon sticks, crystalized ginger, whole cloves, cardamom pods
  • Strain the apple tea. (If desired, store the spices for another batch! I usually use my spices 3 times before discarding.)
  • Store in the refrigerator for a week or two or freeze for longer storage.
  • Enjoy warm or cold.
    apple peel tea in clear mug with apples, cinnamon sticks and carafe of tea in background

Notes

  • *This is my favorite spice combination, but use whatever spices you would like.

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Episode 055 Refrigerated Pickled Green Tomatoes https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode055/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode055/#respond Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:45 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8579 The post Episode 055 Refrigerated Pickled Green Tomatoes appeared first on Food Sensitivity Kitchen.

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Transcript

Welcome to The Sensitive Kitchen where home cooks are inspired to Cook to Enable Those You Love to Flourish. I’m Cindy Sullivan, registered dietitian, passionate nutrition, educator, and accomplished home cook. Whether you’re changing how you cook for food sensitivities, allergies, intolerances, or just trying to eat healthier on a budget, you’re in the right place.

Most episodes, I will share favorite recipes as well as modification tips and nutrition benefits. Occasionally I’ll have a guest or special episode like modifying holiday favorites. My favorite foods? They’re raspberries and homemade chocolate chip cookies. My latest cooking project was long fermented sourdough bread,

Transcript  coming soon!

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Refrigerator Pickled Green Tomatoes https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/refrigerator-pickled-green-tomatoes/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/refrigerator-pickled-green-tomatoes/#respond Sun, 09 Oct 2022 00:51:29 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8539 Do you have tomatoes you have picked off the vine before the first frost?  What are you  going to do with the very green ones?  The ones with no trace of pink appearing usually never turn red – but they make excellent refrigerator pickles! I found this out during a storm in August.  My earth […]

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Do you have tomatoes you have picked off the vine before the first frost?  What are you  going to do with the very green ones?  The ones with no trace of pink appearing usually never turn red – but they make excellent refrigerator pickles!

pickled tomatoes in jars

I found this out during a storm in August.  My earth box tipped over and my dear husband collected and washed over 7 pounds of green cherry tomatoes.  We were headed out of town in two days – what to do with 7+ pounds of green cherry tomatoes??

Tomatoes on ground & green tomatoes in bowl

Our cucumber crop was a failure this year.   So instead of my second refrigerator being filled with refrigerator pickles, it had room.  So I did my research and started pickling.

I tried 3 recipes: a new bread and butter pickle recipe, a dill recipe and my usual pickle recipe.  The new bread and butter recipe I tried contained cloves and I found that their flavor was too overpowering as the pickles aged.  My cucumber pickle recipe was just fine.  But the dill ones were wonderful – reminiscent of naturally fermented pickles my mom and I enjoyed when I was growing up.

Are green tomatoes safe to eat?

Quick answer from the Laid Back Gardener “So, are green tomatoes poisonous? Yes, but only a slightly, not enough to do any harm in most cases.”

Realize that many  plants we eat contain toxic chemicals – mostly to deter pests and animals that would eat them.  But our bodies can safely handle them in the amounts we consume.

For a little more detail, tomatoes contain a family of compounds called alkaloids.  The  ones you may have heard of include solanine and nicotine. As tomatoes ripen, their alkaloid levels drop.  

For example you would have to eat a pound and a half of green tomatoes all at once to reach a lethal level.  For semi ripe tomatoes it is 22 pounds and for ripe tomatoes 64 pounds.

Having said that, a few people may develop some stomach distress from eating green tomatoes (some people even develop stomach distress from ripe tomatoes).  If you are one of those, do not eat unripe tomatoes!!

If you want a little more detail or references, check out The Sensitive Kitchen podcast, episode 055.

Are green tomatoes good for you?

Yes!

They contain about the same amount of vitamin C as ripe tomatoes.  They also contain fiber, beta carotene (plant precursor of vitamin A), calcium, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus and vitamin K.  They are also rich in antioxidants.  Ripe tomatoes will be better sources of these nutrients, but do not discount the fact that unripe tomatoes contain nutrients!

Ingredients

  • tomatoes – green tomatoes that are NOT turning red (keep the ones turning red on your counter and they will turn red!)  I used cherry tomatoes but any will work.  Green tomatoes have tough skin so it is important to cut them in half so the brine can be absorbed.  If you  are working with larger tomatoes, cut into wedges.
  • vinegar – either distilled or apple cider works well.  I do not use fermented vinegar with the mother because this vinegar is going to be boiled so the beneficial bacteria will be destroyed.  Use the cheaper stuff!
  • kosher salt
  • brine

Bread and butter (sweet & sour) brine

  • sugar
  • mustard seeds
  • celery seeds
  • sliced shallots (optional)

Dill Brine

  • dill seeds or dried dill weed
  • bay leaves
  • sliced garlic

Preparing your jars

Even though you are not storing your pickles at room temperature, you want the jars to be very clean.  Either 

  • run them through the dishwasher, or 
  • put them in the sink and pour boiling water over them. Then place them upside down in a dishrack or kitchen towel on the counter to drain for a few minutes.  Then flip the jars to let them air dry.

Preparing the shallots and garlic  (both are optional)

  • Peel and slice the garlic
  • Peel and slice the shallots.  
  • Separate the shallots into rings.  

sliced garlic on cutting board with knife still cutting last clove

Preparing the tomatoes

  • rinse well
  • pick over the tomatoes,  cutting out any bad spots.
  • slice the tomatoes in half
  • place halved tomatoes in jars, adding shallots, onions or garlic interspersed (if using)
  • Leave about an inch of space at the top of the jar so that the brine can cover the tomatoes

Prepare the brine

Place the vinegar, water, sugar (depending on which recipe), and spices into a small saucepan.  Bring to a boil over medium heat.  If using sugar, stir frequently until sugar dissolves. 

Pour the brine over the  pickles.  Seal the jars.  Let cool for a couple of hours at room temperature and refrigerate.  You can start eating pickles in about 3 days, but the flavor will grow much more pronounced over the first couple of weeks.

Tips and Questions

How much brine?

It is always hard to know exactly how much brine to prepare.  The size of your jars and your tomatoes may vary. If you find yourself short you  have two options.  

  1. Make more brine. I usually do this.  It only takes a few minutes.  (The time consuming part of pickles is getting everything ready – not making the brine!)
  2. In a few days, the tomatoes will have shrunk enough for all the tomatoes to be submerged.  However you will need to make sure that the tomatoes on the top end up on the bottom for a few days.  If you choose this method, you will need to remove the tomatoes on the top into one bowl.  Then remove the rest of the tomatoes and put the first ones on the bottom and  replace the rest of the tomatoes.  Remember to sterilize your bowls (method above under preparing the jars) if you choose this method. 

Do I need to use canning jars?

No.  I use a mixture of canning jars and other jars from food products that we have washed and saved.  I do not use canning lids (or not always new lids) and because I am sterilizing them and storing in the refrigerator I have never had a problem.

How long do they last?

A long time.  Since you have sterilized the jars, boiled the vinegar solution and kept them in the refrigerator, the chance that anything will grow in them is remote.  Plus they are acidic so not much will grow. Obviously, if you see mold, etc discard.  I ate my cucumber pickles for an entire year from my refrigerator when we had a bumper crop.

Dill Weed or Dill Seed?

If you use dill weed instead of dill seed, it is a LOT of dill weed.  So you will need to strain out the dill weed before pouring it into jars.  I use a coffee filter inside a strainer to catch the dill weed.  

Which Spices?

Experiment with your brining spices.  I found out 

  • I do not like cloves in my bread and butter variety.  
  • Brown sugar is a waste.  White sugar is so much cheaper and looks better.

If you like it spicy add red pepper flakes or jalapeños.  Try turmeric or lots of garlic!  Let me know how they turn out!

Any other questions?

Drop me a line at cindy@foodsensitivitykitchen.com or ask in the comments below.  Happy pickling!

These pickles require just a  bit of preparation and then you can enjoy them for weeks to come.

Green tomato pickles on a clear plate on the counter

pickled tomatoes in jars
Print

Refrigerator Pickled Green Tomatoes

Green tomatoes become tart, crisp pickles to be enjoyed with sandwiches, pizza and more!
Course Condiment
Cuisine American
Keyword dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free, vegan
Cook Time 1 hour
Refrigeration Time 3 days

Ingredients

  • pounds green tomatoes washed cut in half if cherry tomatoes, cut in wedges if large tomatoes

Dill (Sour) Marinade*

  • cups apple cider vinegar or distilled vinegar
  • cups water
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons dill weed or dill seed
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 3 cloves garlic sliced

Bread & Butter Marinade (sweet & sour)*

  • 2 cups cider vinegar or distilled vinegar
  • ½ cup sugar**
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seed
  • ½ teaspoon celery seed
  • 1-2 shallots

Instructions

Prepare your jars

  • run jars and lids through the dishwasher OR
  • put them in the sink and pour boiling water over them. Then place them upside down in a dishrack or kitchen towel on the counter to drain for a few minutes.  Then flip the jars to let them air dry.

Prepare the vegetables

  • Peel and slice the garlic
  • Peel and slice the shallots. 
  • Separate the shallots into rings.  
  • Rinse the tomatoes well.
  • Pick over the tomatoes,  cutting out any bad spots.
  • For cherry tomatoes, slice the tomatoes in half. For larger tomatoes, cut into wedges.
  • Place cut tomatoes in prepared jars, adding shallots, onions or garlic interspersed (if using). Leave about an inch of space at the top of the jar so that the brine can cover the tomatoes

Preparing the brine ***

  • Place the vinegar, water, sugar (depending on which recipe), and spices into a small saucepan.  Bring to a boil over medium heat.  If using sugar, stir frequently until sugar dissolves. 
  • Pour the brine over the pickles.  Seal the jars.
  • Let cool for a couple of hours at room temperature and refrigerate.
  • You can start eating pickles in about 3 days, but the flavor will grow much more pronounced over the first couple of weeks.

Notes

  • * Use the dill OR the bread and butter marinade.  To use both, you will need 5 pounds of tomatoes.
  • * 1/2 cup sugar will make fairly tart pickles.  You might want to add more sugar if you want sweeter pickles.  Or you can use 1 cup vinegar and 1 cup water.
  • *** It is always hard to know exactly how much brine to prepare.  See blog post for options.

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Mediterranean Roasted Eggplant Ragout https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/mediterranean-roasted-eggplant-ragout/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/mediterranean-roasted-eggplant-ragout/#respond Tue, 27 Sep 2022 11:30:25 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8492 Mediterranean Roasted Eggplant Ragout is simple, delicious, stores well and tastes good warm or cold (as leftovers).  It is best made right now with end of the summer tomatoes and eggplant. Cool evenings will be warmed with this delicious dish. (Although I think any time of the year is great – you can even used […]

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Mediterranean Roasted Eggplant Ragout is simple, delicious, stores well and tastes good warm or cold (as leftovers).  It is best made right now with end of the summer tomatoes and eggplant. Cool evenings will be warmed with this delicious dish. (Although I think any time of the year is great – you can even used canned tomatoes if needed!)

roasted eggplant gratin on plate and fork

This recipe has three stages: roasting the eggplant,  cooking with tomatoes & seasonings  (ragout), and making the gratin.  It is convenient because it can be paused at any stage.  Refrigerate and pick up later in the day or even several days later.

I usually freeze half as this recipe makes a large amount.  The picture below is half the recipe.

What is a ragout?

According to Food and Wine, Ragout is a slow-cooked French-style stew that can be made with meat or fish and vegetables — or even just vegetables.

I usually prepare it as a gratin which means cooking it in a shallow dish and topping with creamy goat cheese or flavorful feta.

Roasted eggplant gratin in gratin dish with one serving gone

Ingredients

  • eggplant – eggplant do not tend to store well so use within a few days  of purchasing – the sooner the better
  • tomatoes  – ripe wonderful in season are best, but use what you have.  Canned may actually be better than fresh  at some times of the year.
  • shallots or onion
  • garlic
  • dried thyme or you can use fresh
  • olive or avocado oil
  • goat cheese or feta  – you can use a dairy free version or just omit and eat right after the ragout stage (without baking) if you desire.
  • spices – I just use thyme to season my  ragout, but fresh basil is also recommended.   If using fresh basil, stir into ragout when it comes off the heat.  Other herbs such as marjoram, oregano will also be lovely.  Experiment to see what you like best!

Preparation

Roasting the eggplant

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  • Wash the eggplant and cut off the stem end.
  • Cut the eggplants in half lengthwise.
  • On the cut side, cut an X into the flesh of the eggplant, down to the skin, leaving the skin intact.
  • Place the eggplant cut side down on a sheet pan lined with parchment, or other liner.
  • Roast for about 20 minutes until skins are wrinkly.
  • Let eggplant cool until cool enough to handle.   Cooled eggplant can be stored in a plastic bag for a couple of days in the refrigerator.

Making the Ragout (aka Cooking with tomatoes and seasonings)

  • While the eggplant cools, prepare your garlic so the allicin can develop.
  • Wash your tomatoes and peel if desired.  Peeling tomatoes can be time consuming.  But peeling them gives a melt-in-your-mouth  texture to this dish.  I usually do not peel my tomatoes, but it is luscious with peeled tomatoes.
  • Chop tomatoes into about 3/4 to 1 inch pieces.
  • Slice the shallots or onion thinly.  If you  are using a bigger shallot or onion, have your pieces about 1 – 1 1/2 inches long.  
  • Peel the eggplant by sliding a knife underneath one end of the peel and pulling.  If the eggplant is not quite done, a knife will help separate the skin from the flesh. The eggplant will cook more if it is not completely tender.
  • Chop the eggplant in 1/2 – 1 inch pieces.  This is the messy part of the recipe! Roasted eggplant is very sticky.
  • Sauté the shallots in olive (or avocado) oil for about 5 minutes over medium low heat until translucent.  
  • Add the garlic and sauté about 30 seconds, stirring frequently.  
  • Add the eggplant and tomatoes.
  • Cook over medium low heat until thick, stirring occasionally.  This will take about 45-60 minutes, depending on the juiciness of your tomatoes.

Making the Gratin

  • To eat immediately, put in a large shallow dish. Half recipe fits well in a12 inch diameter round shallow dish.
  • Top with goat cheese or feta.
  • Bake for about 20 minutes until cheese is warmed through and eggplant is hot.

The eggplant mixture can be stored in the refrigerator for several days or frozen.  If frozen, thaw.  Spread in a shallow dish and top with cheese when ready to eat.  Bake for about 30 minutes.

Leftovers are delicious warm or cold.

roasted eggplant gratin on plate and fork
Print

Mediterranean Roasted Eggplant Ragout

Simple, delicious, stores well and tastes good warm or cold (as leftovers).  It is best made with end of the summer tomatoes and eggplant. It is convenient because it can be paused at any stage.  Refrigerate and pick up later in the day or even several days later.
Course Side Dish
Cuisine Italian
Keyword egg-free, gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free
Prep Time 30 minutes
gratin baking 30 minutes
Servings 6
Calories 170kcal
Cost 30

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds eggplant 2 large or 3 medium
  • 2 tablespoons olive or avocado oil
  • 2 shallots or 1 medium onion (or to taste) thinly sliced
  • 3-4 large cloves garlic minced or put through a press
  • 2 pounds (8 medium size or 4 large) tomatoes chopped, peeled and seeded if desired
  • ½ teaspoon dried thyme use 1 teaspoon fresh if available
  • 3 ounces goat cheese or feta* amount to taste

Instructions

Roast the Eggplant

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  • Wash the eggplant and cut off the stem end. Cut the eggplants in half
  • On the cut side, cut an X into the flesh of the eggplant, down to the skin, trying to leave the skin intact.
  • Place the eggplant cut side down on a sheet pan lined with parchment, or other liner.
  • Roast for about 20 minutes until skins are wrinkly.
  • Let eggplant cool until cool enough to handle.   Note: Cooled eggplant can be stored in a plastic bag for a couple of days in the refrigerator.

Making the Ragout

  • While the eggplant cooks, prepare your garlic so the allicin can develop.**
  • Wash your tomatoes and peel and seed if desired.*** Chop into about ¾ to 1 inch pieces.
  • Slice the shallots or onion thinly.  If you are using a bigger shallot or onion, have your pieces about 1 - 1 ½ inches long.  
  • Peel the eggplant by sliding a knife underneath one end of the peel and pulling.  If you have trouble, run the knife under the edge of the skin.  It will come off in strips.
  • Chop the eggplant in ½ - 1 inch pieces.  
  • Sauté the shallots in olive (or avocado) oil for about 5 minutes over medium low heat until translucent.  
  • Add the garlic and thyme. Sauté about 30 seconds, stirring frequently.  
  • Add the eggplant and tomatoes. Cook over medium low heat until thick, stirring occasionally.  This will take about 45  minutes, depending on the juiciness of your tomatoes.

To make the gratin

  • To eat immediately, spread evenly in a large shallow dish, about 12 inches in diameter. (I usually only use half the ragout and save or freeze the other half.)
  • Top with cheese.
  • Bake at 400° for 15-20 minutes. Increase baking time to 25-30 minutes if the ragout is cold.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

  • *use dairy free cheese to make this dish dairy free or vegan.
  • **Allicin is a powerfrul antioxidant that develops when cut garlic is exposed to air for about 10+ minutes.  For more information listen to The Sensitive Kitchen podcast episode or see the accompanying blog post.
  • ***Peeling tomatoes can be time consuming.  But peeling them gives a melt-in-your-mouth  texture to this dish.  I usually do not peel my tomatoes, but it is luscious with peeled tomatoes.

Nutrition

Calories: 170kcal | Carbohydrates: 22g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 7mg | Sodium: 255mg | Potassium: 830mg | Fiber: 8g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 510IU | Vitamin C: 18mg | Vitamin D: 0.1µg | Vitamin E: 3mg | Vitamin K: 18µg | Calcium: 92mg | Folate: 58µg | Iron: 3mg | Zinc: 1mg

cookbook reference

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Episode 054 Mediterranean Roasted Eggplant Ragout https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode054/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/episode054/#respond Tue, 27 Sep 2022 11:12:55 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8510 The post Episode 054 Mediterranean Roasted Eggplant Ragout appeared first on Food Sensitivity Kitchen.

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The button below will take you to Apple Podcasts to subscribe.
Or visit your favorite podcast provider to subscribe.
Thank you!

Transcript

Welcome to The Sensitive Kitchen where home cooks are inspired to Cook to Enable Those You Love to Flourish. I’m Cindy Sullivan, registered dietitian, passionate nutrition, educator, and accomplished home cook. Whether you’re changing how you cook for food sensitivities, allergies, intolerances, or just trying to eat healthier on a budget, you’re in the right place.

Most episodes, I will share favorite recipes as well as modification tips and nutrition benefits. Occasionally I’ll have a guest or special episode like modifying holiday favorites. My favorite foods? They’re raspberries and homemade chocolate chip cookies. My latest cooking project was long fermented sourdough bread,

Transcript  coming soon!

References

Recipe modified from Provencal Light: Traditional Recipes from Provence for Today’s Healthy LIfestyles by Martha Rose Shulman, A Bantam Book, New York 1994

Food and Wine, https://www.foodandwine.com/cooking-techniques/whats-difference-between-ragu-and-ragout

 https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/glossary/gratin-glossary

7 Surprising Health Benefits of Eggplants By Rachael Link, MS, RD on June 30, 2017 https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/eggplant-benefits

 

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Gluten Free Stuffed Peppers for Dinner & Your Freezer https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/gluten-free-stuffed-peppers-for-dinner-your-freezer/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/gluten-free-stuffed-peppers-for-dinner-your-freezer/#respond Tue, 26 Jul 2022 11:33:35 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8401 The post Gluten Free Stuffed Peppers for Dinner & Your Freezer appeared first on Food Sensitivity Kitchen.

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Transcript

Welcome to The Sensitive Kitchen where home cooks are inspired to Cook to Enable Those You Love to Flourish. I’m Cindy Sullivan, registered dietitian, passionate nutrition, educator, and accomplished home cook. Whether you’re changing how you cook for food sensitivities, allergies, intolerances, or just trying to eat healthier on a budget, you’re in the right place.

Most episodes, I will share favorite recipes as well as modification tips and nutrition benefits. Occasionally I’ll have a guest or special episode like modifying holiday favorites. My favorite foods? They’re raspberries and homemade chocolate chip cookies. My latest cooking project was long fermented sourdough bread,

Transcript  coming soon!

References

Nourish by WebMD

https://www.webmd.com/diet/health-benefits-bell-peppers

pastedGraphic.png

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/top-5-health-benefits-of-peppers

Bell Pepper FAQs: Your Top 10 Questions Answered

https://www.naturefresh.ca/bell-pepper-faqs-facts/

Bell Peppers Are Nutrient-Dense and Low in Calories — Here’s How to Eat More

By Abbie Gellman, MS, RD, CDN

Updated April 22, 2021

Reviewed by Bonnie Taub-Dix, MA, RD, CDN

https://www.consumerreports.org/fruits-vegetables/vegetables-that-are-healthier-cooked/

8 Vegetables That Are Healthier Cooked

Boost nutrition and flavor with these tips

By Jessica Branch

Last updated: September 27, 2019

Analysis of Native Carotenoid Composition of Sweet Bell Peppers by Serially Coupled C30 Columns

Daniele Giuffridaa*, Paola Dugob,c, Giacomo Dugoa, Germana Torreb and Luigi Mondellob,c

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1934578X1100601207

Health-promoting Carotenoids and Phenolics in 31 Capsicum Accessions

in HortScience

Authors: Ivette Guzman1, Krystal Vargas1, Francisco Chacon1, Calen McKenzie1, and Paul W. Bosland1

https://journals.ashs.org/hortsci/view/journals/hortsci/56/1/article-p36.xml

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6827103/

Carotenoids of Capsicum Fruits: Pigment Profile and Health-Promoting Functional Attributes

Norazian Mohd Hassan,1,* Nurul Asyiqin Yusof,2 Amirah Fareeza Yahaya,1 Nurul Nasyitah Mohd Rozali,1 and Rashidi Othman3,4

Effects of Different Cooking Methods on the Antioxidant Properties of Red Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

In Guk Hwang,1 Young Jee Shin,1 Seongeung Lee,2 Junsoo Lee,2 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3866734/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835915/

Plant polyphenols as dietary antioxidants in human health and disease

Kanti Bhooshan Pandey and Syed Ibrahim RizvipastedGraphic.png

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Gluten Free Stuffed Peppers for Dinner & Your Freezer https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/gluten-free-stuffed-peppers/ https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/gluten-free-stuffed-peppers/#respond Tue, 26 Jul 2022 11:31:00 +0000 https://foodsensitivitykitchen.com/?p=8399 Baking the filling in the pepper transforms the pepper into something a shell of “deliciousness,” and adds another dimension of flavor to the filling.  Whether you are cooking for a crowd or extra meals for your freezer, read on! Did you grow up eating stuffed peppers?   If so, these are comfort food.  If not, […]

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Baking the filling in the pepper transforms the pepper into something a shell of “deliciousness,” and adds another dimension of flavor to the filling.  Whether you are cooking for a crowd or extra meals for your freezer, read on!

Did you grow up eating stuffed peppers?   If so, these are comfort food.  If not, then you are in for a treat.

This recipe makes a large quantity so you can feed a crowd or you  can use my  cook once, eat (at least) twice philosophy and freeze some for later.  This recipe takes a little longer than  some, but it is worth it for the extra for later in the  week or for your freezer.

My first stuffed pepper recipe I developed lives on a piece of yellow legal pad paper that I wrote out years ago.   I got some ideas from Cook’s Illustrated recipe (like combining the ketchup with juice from the canned tomatoes  – genius!) and have continued to modify it over the years.  

I have streamlined the recipe to make these less fussy and easier than many stuffed peppers recipes.  

  1. I cut the peppers in half .  It is SO much easier to stuff and work with than using whole peppers and trying to scoop out the seeds.  Plus it takes less time  to thaw if you freeze them.
  2. I stuff my peppers raw.  To not have to boil the peppers, put in cold water to stop the cooking, drain the peppers and try to stuff floppy peppers, saves time and energy.  To say nothing of the large pot, bowl, slotted spoon etc that do not need washing. 
  3. I cook the filling before baking the peppers.  This reduces the baking time.
  4. I use cooked brown rice from my freezer.  (I bake my  brown rice in a 9×13 pan and freeze most of it.  That way it is ready for meals.)  Leftover rice will work, or you can cook some fresh.  The amount of rice is approximate.  I use about as much rice as meat.  Use more or less to your taste.

To add nutrients

  1. I add carrots to the filling.  They add interest, a touch of sweetness, and more vegetables without even trying!  Plus the beta-carotene soars.
  2. I add cheese to the filling.  It helps the filling stick together better when the peppers are eaten and adds creaminess to the filling.  Protein, calcium and riboflavin are added.  If you are avoiding dairy, use  a  non-dairy shredded cheese or leave it out.

Ingredients

  • peppers  – green  or colored or combo.   Pick  peppers that  have two flatter sides if possible.  Since you will be cutting the peppers in half from top to bottom, they will  be  laying on a side when stuffed.
  • meat – lean –  gr  sirloin  (turkey or chicken or pork should work  – will  change flavor)
  • rice –  I use cooked, frozen brown rice.   You  can cook  rice  or use leftover.
  • canned diced tomatoes.   I use petite diced.
  • shallot or  onion
  • garlic
  • carrot, chopped finely
  • shredded cheese
  • ketchup

Preparation

Prepare the peppers

  • Rinse the peppers and look for the flatter sides so the pepper will lie flat when stuffed.  Cut in half from top to bottom (stem to blossom end not around the “equator” of the pepper.)  
  • Carefully cut around the stem and remove the  stem and seeds.  You may need to also remove some ribs and seeds from the sides.
  • Arrange the peppers in a single layer in baking dishes.  I often use corning ware as it can go into the freezer and the oven. 

Note:   Most cookware that is not metal cannot go directly from the freezer to  the oven or it will shatter.  Let it thaw overnight in the refrigerator or thaw at low power in the microwave.

Prepare the filling.

  • Cut the garlic, shallots (or onions), and carrots.  
  • Add the vegetables and the ground meat to the pan.  Stir until no large chunks of meat remain.  Cook until meet is browned.  
  • Drain the tomatoes and reserve 1/4 cup of the liquid.  Add the tomatoes to the pan.  Stir,
  • Add rice to the pan.  If the rice is frozen, put it on top on low heat until the rice thaws.  
  • Take off the heat and add cheese.  Stir until cheese melts.

Finishing the Peppers

  • Fill the peppers with filling.  
  • Combine reserved tomato juice with ketchup.   Spoon tomato mixture over stuffed peppers.  
  • Bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes.  Eat right away or cool and freeze covered.  

Can I freeze them?

I usually cover my cooled  peppers with a piece of plastic wrap and the plastic covers that came with my corningware.  Other glass or metal containers will freeze well, but how they are covered will influence how long they keep in the freezer.  Plastic wrap under foil will keep the  moisture in longer than just foil,  but it will not last as long as a plasic or silicone sealed lid.   Mine keep for several months in the freezer.  

I freeze mine right in the CorningWare then reheat in the microwave (or oven) when ready to eat.  Just be sure not to put a  frozen ceramic pan directly from the freezer into the oven.  Thaw in the refrigerator or microwave first.

I have also frozen the filling when I had extra.  This is harder to manage because the cheese makes it harder to thaw and then fill the peppers.  

Health Benefits and Nutrients of Sweet or Bell Peppers

Bell peppers are a nutrient powerhouse. One serving of bell peppers is 1 cup chopped, raw or cooked, or 1 medium raw bell pepper and contains:

  • Calories: 31
  • Total fat : 0.4 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg
  • Sodium : 4.8 mg
  • Total carbs : 7.2 g
  • Dietary fiber: 2.5 g
  • Sugar: 5 g
  • Added sugar: 0 g
  • Protein : 1.2 g

Vitamins, Minerals and Other Micronutrients

  • Vitamin C : 169% of your Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin A : 21% DV
  • Vitamin B6 : 20% DV
  • Folate: 14% DV
  • Vitamin E: 13% DV
  • Vitamin B1: 5% DV
  • Vitamin B2: 8% DV
  • Vitamin B3: 7% DV
  • Vitamin B5: 8% DV
  • Vitamin K: 5% DV
  • Potassium: 5% DV
  • Manganese : 6% DV

In terms of nutrients, it does make a difference what color pepper you have selected.

Green are immature  – they contain less sugar and fewer nutrients because they have not had a chance to fully develop.  The notable exception to this rule however are the compounds known as polyphenols. Polyphenol rich diets provide protection against the development and progression of many chronic diseases and conditions including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular problems, and aging. 

Nutritionally, yellow and orange peppers are very similar. But there are a few significant differences between red, and yellow/orange.

Per 100g, yellow and orange peppers contain about 60 mg more vitamin C, however they contain fewer and different carotinoids which are a family  of naturally occurring antioxidant compounds.  Different carotenoids have different levels of absorption  and protect different parts of the body.  For example luetin is especially important in protecting your retina and vision.

In the past we have heard more about beta carotene because it is more easily absorbed and turned into vitamin A.  However the more research is done, the more we realize the beneficial effects of a wide variety of carotenoids.

Generally, the dark red colored fruit presents the highest total carotenoids content compared with those with lighter color and non-red peppers.  The amount in red peppers is approximately four to five times higher than in green peppers.

The health promoting effects of bell peppers are being studied but there is some evidence for bell peppers helping control blood glucose, weight gain, protection against skin aging, maintaining the function and structure of the retina  which is important in eye health and vision, cardiovascular disease, local anti – inflammatory properties to reduce pain.  For more detail on these effects see The Sensitive Kitchen podcast, episode053. (References are there as well.) 

For more recipes featuring bell peppers try Gluten Free Stir Fry – without Soy

Protein Pasta Salad with Marinated Beans (gluten free and vegan options)

Asparagus and Red Pepper Salad

Print

Gluten Free Stuffed Peppers

Baking the filling in the pepper transforms the pepper into something a shell of "deliciousness," and adds another dimension to the filling.  Whether you are cooking for a crowd or extra meals for your freezer, this recipe is for you!
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Keyword egg-free, gluten-free, nut-free, soy-free
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 230kcal

Ingredients

  • 4-5 peppers, green or colored
  • 1 pound lean ground beef
  • 1 large carrot, finely chopped optional
  • 1 small or medium onion or 2 shallots
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 14½ ounce can petite diced tomatoes, drained with  1/4 cup juice reserved
  • 1½-2 cups cooked brown rice or white rice
  • 1 cup shredded cheese (4 ounces)
  • ¼ cup  ketchup

Instructions

Prepare the Peppers

  • Rinse the peppers and look for the flatter sides so the pepper will lie flat when stuffed. 
  •   Cut in half from top to bottom (stem to blossom end not around the "equator" or middle of the pepper.)  
  • Carefully cut around the stem and remove the stem and seeds.  You may need to also remove some ribs and seeds from the sides.
  • Arrange the peppers in a single layer in baking dishes.

Prepare the Filling

  • Cut the garlic, shallots (or onions), and carrots.  
  • Add the vegetables and the ground meat to the pan.  Stir until no large chunks of meat remain.  Cook until meat is browned.
  • Drain the tomatoes and reserve 1/4 cup of the liquid.  Add the tomatoes to the pan.  Stir.
  • Add rice to the pan.  If the rice is frozen, put it on top of the  meat vegetables mixture so it does not stick.  Simmer over low heat until the rice thaws.  If you  have a cover to go  over the frying pan, it will speed the thawing.
  • Take off the heat and add cheese.  Stir until cheese melts.

Filling and Baking

  • Place pepper halves in pans.  Fill the peppers with filling.  
  • Combine reserved tomato juice with ketchup.  Spoon tomato mixture over stuffed peppers. 
  • Bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes, until pepper is tender when stabbed with a fork.
  • Eat right away or cool and freeze covered.  

Nutrition

Calories: 230kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 17g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Trans Fat: 0.4g | Cholesterol: 48mg | Sodium: 270mg | Potassium: 552mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 3610IU | Vitamin C: 82mg | Vitamin D: 0.1µg | Vitamin E: 2mg | Vitamin K: 8µg | Calcium: 109mg | Folate: 42µg | Iron: 3mg | Zinc: 4mg

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